Archive for the ‘B is for Bilocate’ Category

Remote Viewing. No Cameras Needed.

Monday, January 11th, 2010

Photo via flickr by Bill M

While it’s believed that many mystics and saints could bilocate, such as Padre Pio whose doppelganger would be seen simultaneously around the world, the stealth tactic of remote viewing is more secular although lesser known. Remote viewing, the ability to perceive and obtain information about a distant person or event armed with only geographical coordinates, was the objective of the 1972 CIA-sponsored project led by scientists Hal Puthoff and Russell Targ at Stanford Research Institute (SRI), and conducted by now-famous remote viewers Ingo Swann and Uri Geller, among others, for the purpose of espionage.

Following, Jacques Vallee, Venture Capitalist, explains:

Remote viewing is a very rich opportunity for experimentation about how information can be transmitted from one part of the world to another, from one part of our world to another. One of the surprising claims of remote viewing is that this can be done in time. If that could be validated then we would have another need to research what time really is. The question, the basic question is, “Is there really such a thing as time?” Does time, itself, have multiple dimensions? If time is a dimension, why should we only be able to go one way? When we’re told that time is a dimension like the others, that’s obviously not true because time only goes in one direction. I can move back and forth in x, y, and z. I cannot move back and forth in time. Or can we? Now if we can then that would give us insight into something that has been a mystery ever since mankind has existed, and it will immediately raise a lot of spiritual, religious questions. What is left? If time can be reversed then we exist forever. Or we can access other consciousness that may not be tied to the human body, to the human brain. That would open up all kinds of new areas. So the moment we break out of the multidimensional model that we have today, all kinds of things become possible.

B is for Bilocate

Saturday, May 9th, 2009

Emotions sometimes speed out of control before we can define them, and suddenly we’re transported inside of Steven Spielberg’s celluloid world, only to find two hours later, physically we haven’t traveled at all. Dreaming is similar. Your physical body is sleeping, but your mind is somewhere else. The ability to be in two places at the same time is no doubt the role of imagination, but increasingly a mission of technology, evident by our everyday telephone that allows us to feel joined in another space, to our now-future where holograms beam CNN reporters and Telstra executives in real-time. While it’s believed that many mystics and saints could bilocate, such as Padre Pio whose doppelganger would be seen simultaneously around the world, the stealth tactic of remote viewing is more secular although lesser known. Remote viewing, the ability to perceive and obtain information about a distant person or event armed with only geographical coordinates, was the objective of the 1972 CIA-sponsored project led by scientists Hal Puthoff and Russell Targ at Stanford Research Institute (SRI), and conducted by now-famous remote viewers Ingo Swann and Uri Geller, among others, for the purpose of espionage. Although the operation ended, as it did at the Princeton Engineering Anomalies Research Lab (PEAR) where remote viewing experiments as well as other mind-matter scientific studies occurred for nearly three decades, investigation into the tools and techniques continue and are freely accessible to the masses. Now, despite the fact that astral projection and out-of-body experiences make skeptics like James Randi chuckle, it’s apparent that culture’s desire to behave like a quanta and be in two places at once isn’t going away. And as to whether or not technology can make us omnipresent like God himself-herself-itself-yourself, well, I guess we’ll “see.”